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Vrutti is registered under Section 80 G of India's Income Tax Act 1961 . This means in India that you can deduct 50% of the donation you made through your tax return.

Background

Vrutti has been working with rural communities for the last 10 years, who are predominantly dependent on farm-based livelihoods to improve their resilience and create wealth using an ‘entrepreneurship-led’ model to bring about lasting and scalable impact among the farming community by making farmers realize that ‘agriculture/ farming’ is an enterprise, farmer an entrepreneur, and delivery of services through entrepreneurship-led approaches.
We have been collectivizing the farmers, training them on good agriculture practices, facilitating access to better inputs and finance to buy the inputs, helping them sell their produce collectively. Now we want the farmers to start moving up the value chain.

One of the initiatives we want to do now is to help a few farmers set up and run a small mill to process and package dal ( pulses) .
What this Campaign is about

Currently the farmers directly sell their raw produce. The idea is to process the raw pulses so that the farmers get a higher return on their investment. we want to do now is to help a few farmers set up and run a small mill to process and package dal ( pulses). For that we need to set up a mini mill - https://letzchange.org/projects/help-small-farmers-earn-livelihood-through-value-added-activities.

We have selected Kalaburgi ( earlier known as Gulbarga) in the State of Karnataka . Kalburgi is known for its high quality and voluminous production of pulses. Small and Marginal Farmers are barely able to make their ends meet from sales of their raw produce. They are also adversely affected by low productivity (30-40% of potential levels), high variability in production and quality, with low scale operations (smallholding, rain-fed, climatic variability). Farmers currently sell their produce in raw form. That produce is passed through a network of intermediaries that includes several layers of traders, processing mills, and wholesalers/retailers. Farmers are systematically exploited in this process due to asymmetries in information and inefficiencies in this chain. Ultimately, the farmer receives less than 1/3 of the retail price for processed dals.

We are trying to crowdsVruttice after not being able to to raise the initial capital from other sVruttices.
The seed capital needed is Rs.670,000 ( USD 10,011) for the plant.
We have already raised Rs. 1,18,725 ( USD 1774.13 ) and need to raise another Rs 551275 ( USD 8237.82 ) to help the farmers set up their plant.

Please contribute and help share the word - https://letzchange.org/projects/help-small-farmers-earn-livelihood-through-value-added-activities.


All are welcome to come and visit the areas where Vrutti works to understand what we are trying to achieve . A short documentary of work - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChS-vd5wRXI

In India Vrutti is registered under the Foreign Contribution Regulation Act - FCRA (2010) . That means it can accept donations from foreign nationals.

Also Vrutti is registered under Section 80 G of India's Income Tax Act 1961 . This means in India that you can deduct 50% of the donation you made through your tax return.

 

Why you should help the small farmers

Agriculture is an important sector of the Indian economy, accounting for 13.7% of the nation's GDP in 2012–13 (down from 30% in 1990–91), and about 11% of its exports, and serving as the principal sVruttice of income for about half the country's population. At 179.9 million hectares, India holds the second largest agricultural land in the world and 4% of the world's water resVruttices, but has to support about 17% of the world's human population and 15% of the livestock. With 20 agri-climactic regions, all 15 major climates in the world exist in India. The country also possesses 46 of the 60 soil types in the world. In the crop year 2011-12 (July-June), India had a record food grain production of 259.29 million tonnes.
Despite all this, the plight of Indian farmers, especially of small and marginal ones, is worsening with each passing year. Since 1995, more than 290,000 farmers have committed suicide and around 2,358 farmers are quitting agriculture daily. With the average monthly income of farm households (Rs 2,115) now lower than their average monthly expenditures (Rs 2,700), it is not surprising that the food producers who feed the entire nation are dying of hunger and malnutrition.